Life and My Box: School’s Out

Kate Zahnleiter was raised by a single working mother and a television. She writes that “not a day goes by in which I’m unable to relate something which occurs in real life back to an episode of something I watched as a child, teenager or young adult.” In Life and My Box, Kate shares the lessons she has learned from TV. 

When I was a teenager, I watched a lot of reruns of Degrassi Junior High and, when that was finished, the just as delightful Degrassi High (I can only hope you are humming the theme song to one of these now—I prefer High, but it’s really just a matter of adding or subtracting the word “junior” to your personal taste). I used to think of myself as a bit of a Caitlin Ryan, because she was a feminist and a journalist and a social activist and did a lot of things I liked to think I’d do if I wasn’t so lazy and didn’t have to spend so much time pretending I could skateboard and making sure my Tencel jeans looked amazing (both Caitlin and I did question our sexuality after having a sexy dream about a female teacher, but that didn’t really need a lot of effort on my part).

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A Book, a Playlist: Steeplechase

Steeplechase, a novel by Brisbane-based writer Krissy Kneen, explores the relationships between many things: between sisters Bec and Emily, between art and madness, and between the past and present. Bec, a painter and tertiary art teacher living in Brisbane, receives a phone call from her estranged sister Emily while recovering from surgery. Emily, an acclaimed artist and now living in Beijing, invites Bec to visit her for the opening of a new show. With this, Bec is confronted by an awful past, some great and terrible event during their isolated childhood in rural Queensland that drove the two sisters apart.

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Life and My Box: Polygamy Loves Company

Kate Zahnleiter was raised by a single working mother and a television. She writes that “not a day goes by in which I’m unable to relate something which occurs in real life back to an episode of something I watched as a child, teenager or young adult.” In Life and My Box, Kate shares the lessons she has learned from TV. 

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Life and My Box: Oz, the Great and Powerful

Kate Zahnleiter was raised by a single working mother and a television. She writes that “not a day goes by in which I’m unable to relate something which occurs in real life back to an episode of something I watched as a child, teenager or young adult.” In Life and My Box, Kate shares the lessons she has learned from TV. 
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Life and My Box: Bad Girl Throws Up on the White Picket Fence

Kate Zahnleiter was raised by a single working mother and a television. She writes that “not a day goes by in which I’m unable to relate something which occurs in real life back to an episode of something I watched as a child, teenager or young adult.” In Life and My Box, Kate will be sharing the lessons she has learned from TV. First up, Dawson’s Creek (*~I DON’T WANNA WAIT~*):

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I H8 UR DIK: Hair

There are a lot of ways to Smash the Patriarchy and one of them is to cut your own hair.

Think about it: doing your hair yourself is another way to sever your ties to an industry that is part of the vast conspiracy to take away women’s agency and control how they look through the conferring of “expert” status on random people with no real qualifications, in this case dudes with scissors. You notice how all the Hair Stylists to the Stars are men? What the heck man! And haircuts remain a service with staggeringly different prices for men and women. James Butler can get a short back & sides for $25 but my hair–a very similar style!–costs $60+? Nuh uh! Cutting your own hair is cheap AND subversive. Also it is fun.

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